Malware

Malware is often equated with computer viruses. But there are legitimate ways to keep your computer and devices secure.

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If you’re ever caught with a piece of malware on your computer or device, chances are that it was a result of trying to steal money from other people, law enforcement says.

It’s estimated that approximately 45,000 people in the United States are victims of computer crimes. Among them are the victims of identity theft, such as when someone doesn’t have the right information, or when they give the wrong password to their computer, officials say.

Some people may be tempted to try to gain unauthorized access to your computer and then use the stolen money to buy more expensive gadgets or services, the FBI says.

Hackers gain access to computers when they steal someone’s password or other data from their computer or device, The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team, or U.S. CERT, says on its website. “Computer access can also be gained simply by gaining access to a computer, or one of the devices on which it is stored.”

FBI says it’s no surprise the average person doesn’t know their computer’s vulnerabilities. This is why a lot of people get their computers hacked and lose their data. When this happens, they turn to computer repair services, which always gets the job done.

What’s in your Gmail, Yahoo mail inbox? If you’re not sure, here’s a list of the most popular passwords in the 2016 dumps. The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team, or U.S. CERT, has been releasing information to educate people about the dangers of stealing computers and devices and creating malware to access your data and create a data breach.

More than 300 CERT sites were recently set up to remind people about the need to properly set their passwords and protect their online accounts, the FBI said in a March bulletin released Monday.

“We also remind victims that they need to reset their account passwords promptly, and they should not use the same password across multiple websites,” the FBI said.

“Pairing passwords across multiple sites is a very serious security risk and can result in an account being accessed by multiple attackers, resulting in potential identity theft, as well as financial loss and damage to the bank account,” the FBI said.

A good password should be something you can remember and use across many sites, such as your e-mail, your Facebook or Twitter accounts, the FBI said. It should also be something you don’t use for anything but online activities. Consult your internet provider on how they can make your network secure. If you need more information about internet packages, learn more here.